Jumping Rivers and WhyR partnership

We love supporting the community around the open source tools that we use on a daily basis. In the past, Jumping Rivers has helped useR user groups and SatRdays events to happen by enabling frictionless sponsorship for European groups. We believe that it is our duty to help grow the community that helps us. With

Free Workshops for Meetup Groups

For the last few years we’ve offered automatic sponsorship for meet-ups and satRday events. However for obvious COVID related reasons, most (all?) meet-ups have meeting getting together virtually, so the need for extra Pizza money has diminished. As with most organisations, we’ve had to adapted to the new online-first environment. In particular, running primarily online

Detecting Security Vulnerabilities in R Packages

One of our main roles at Jumping Rivers is to set-up and provide ongoing maintenance to R, Python and RStudio infrastructure. This typically involves ensuring software is up-to-date and making sure everything is running smoothly. The OSS Index developed by Sonatype is a free catalogue of open source components and scanning tools to help developers

Job Opportunities: Data Scientist and Engineer

Jumping Rivers is a data science consultancy company focused on R and Python. We work across industries and throughout the world. We offer a mixture of training, modelling, and infrastructure support. Jumping Rivers is an RStudio Full Service Certified Partner. Location: We are based in Newcastle upon Tyne. However, since the creation of the company

Recreating a Shiny App with Flask

So RStudio Connect has embraced Python and now runs Flask applications! At Jumping Rivers we make a lot of use of R, shiny, and Python for creating visual tools for our clients. Shiny has a lot of nice features, in particular it is very fast for prototyping web applications. Over our morning meeting we discussed

Setting the Graphics Device in a RMarkdown Document

In our recent post about saving R graphics, it became obvious that achieving consistent graphics across platforms or even saving the “correct” graph on a particular OS was challenging. Getting consistent fonts across platforms often failed, and for the default PNG device under Windows, anti-aliasing was also an issue. The conclusion of the post was

Saving R Graphics across OSs

R is known for it’s amazing graphics. Not only ggplot2, but also plotly, and the other dozens of packages at the graphics task view. There seems to be a graph for every scenario. However once you’ve created your figure, how do you export it? This post compares standard methods for exporting R plots as PNGs/PDFs

Faster R package installation

Faster package installation Every few weeks or so, a tweet pops up asking about how to speed up package installation in R Depending on the luck of twitter, the author may get a few suggestions. The bigger picture is that package installation time is starting to become more of an issue for a number of