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Shiny for Python: Creating a simple Twitter analytics dashboard

Introduction As someone who has zero experience using Shiny in R, the recent announcement that the framework had been made available to Python users inspired an opportunity for me to learn a new concept from a different perspective to most of my colleagues. I have been tasked with writing a Python related blog post, and having spent the past few weeks carrying out an analysis of Jumping Rivers’ Twitter data (@jumping_uk), creating a dashboard to display some of my findings and then writing about it seemed like a nice way to cap off my 6-week summer placement at Jumping Rivers.

Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 3

This is part two of our three part series Part 1: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 1 Part 2: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 2 Part 3: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 3 (this post) So far, we have seen how to create an app using ReactJS and and a Plumber API.

Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 2

This is part two of our three part series Part 1: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 1 Part 2: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 2 (this post) Part 3: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 3 In the first part of this series, we introduced the technologies and packages required to create an application using ReactJS and an R {plumber} API instead of {shiny}.

Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 1

This is part one of our three part series Part 1: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 1 (this post) Part 2: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 2 Part 3: Recreating the Shiny App tutorial with a Plumber API + React: Part 3 RStudio Connect supports a spectrum of data products, static or dynamic. Being able to host static content on RStudio Connect means we can host ReactJS applications on the platform.

Recreating a Shiny App with Flask

So RStudio Connect has embraced Python and now runs Flask applications! At Jumping Rivers we make a lot of use of R, shiny, and Python for creating visual tools for our clients. Shiny has a lot of nice features, in particular it is very fast for prototyping web applications. Over our morning meeting we discussed the fact that flask will soon be coming to RStudio products and wondered how easy it would be to recreate one of the simple shiny examples as a flask application.